Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Non-native Species

If you know anything about Eurasian Collared-doves as shown above, you may wonder what I find photo worthy about this bird. They are a non­­-native species that has spread across the United States in the last thirty years at an alarming rate.  But what caught my attention was that this was the first time I have actually seen this bird in Salemtowne since moving here over three months ago.  We have been enjoying watching the native Mourning Doves daily at our feeder and were somewhat surprised when a pair of Eurasian Collared-doves swept in and took control of the feeder area.  This reminded me of what took place at our home in Elkton several years ago.  The more Eurasian Collared-doves we saw the fewer native Mourning Doves we saw, until we rarely saw any Mourning Doves.  And here is another interesting example. While birding at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge yesterday, we saw a group of 22 Eurasian Collared-doves at Pintail Marsh. I’ve usually only seen them in urban areas, so was surprised to see this large number in a rather natural area. The Eurasian Collared-dove, as well as the Eastern Fox Squirrel that I have posted about the last two days, are both non-native species that are spreading rapidly, and in my opinion are crowding out native species.

4 comments:

  1. I wonder if an open and encouraged hunting season would help the Eurasian Collard-dove situation. I expect that not too many people hunt doves any more.

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    1. There is open season year around on this dove.

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  2. I've read the collard dove doesn't push out mourning dove, but I agree with you that they do. Mourning doves used to be regulars in my yard. I still see them sometimes, but the collard doves are here every day.

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    1. Yes Elva I've read the same, but my observations, starting in Arizona in 2005 and Oregon later, lead me to think they take over. By the way, Cooper's Hawks love them. :)

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